Posts tagged United States.
Time 3 Minute Read

On March 27, 2024, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (“NTIA”) issued its AI Accountability Report, and, on March 28, 2024, the White House announced the Office of Budget and Management’s (“OMB’s”) government-wide policy on AI risk management.

Time 1 Minute Read

On November 28, 2023, the New York Department of Financial Services (“NYDFS”) announced that First American Title Insurance Company (“First American”), the second-largest title insurance company in the United States, would pay a $1 million penalty for violations of the NYDFS Cybersecurity Regulation in connection with a 2019 data breach. The NYDFS investigated the company’s response to the data breach and alleged that First American knew of a vulnerability in its technical systems that exposed consumers’ non-public information, but failed to investigate or ...

Time 5 Minute Read

On October 30, 2023, U.S. President Biden issued an Executive Order on Safe, Secure, and Trustworthy Artificial Intelligence. It marks the Biden Administration’s most comprehensive action on artificial intelligence policy, building upon the Administration’s Blueprint for an AI Bill of Rights (issued in October 2022) and its announcement (in July 2023) of securing voluntary commitments from 15 leading AI companies to manage AI risks.

Time 3 Minute Read

On October 17, 2023, The First-tier Tribunal of the UK General Regulatory Chamber allowed an appeal by Clearview AI Inc. (“Clearview”) against an enforcement notice and fine issued by the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”).

Time 1 Minute Read

On October 5, 2023, Blackbaud Inc., a software provider for the philanthropy, healthcare, and education sectors, has resolved claims that the District of Columbia and 49 U.S. states raised. The claims stem from a ransomware attack that impacted Blackbaud in 2020. The company was affected by a ransomware attack that exposed user information to unauthorized third parties. The breach not only impacted approximately 13,000 Blackbaud customers, but the customers’ own clients and donors as well.

Time 1 Minute Read

On September 29, 2023, the Supreme Court of the United States (“SCOTUS”) accepted petitions challenging the constitutionality of social media laws in Florida and Texas. Florida’s law, S.B. 7072, prohibits “a social media platform from willfully deplatforming a [political] candidate.” Texas’s law, H.B. 20, refers to social media platforms as “common carriers” that are “central public forums for public debate,” and requires common carriers to publicly disclose information related to the common carrier’s method of recommending content to users, content moderation efforts, use of algorithms to determine search results, and the common carrier’s ordinary disclosures to its users on user performance data for each of its platforms. Both of these laws were challenged by NetChoice, LLC, a national trade association of large online businesses, who had recent successes in blocking several laws, including the California Age-Appropriate Design Code and a similar social media law in Arkansas.

Time 3 Minute Read

On September 21, 2023, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”) published an opinion on the UK Government’s assessment of adequacy for the UK Extension to the EU-U.S. Data Privacy Framework (the “UK Extension”). The ICO provides that, while it is reasonable for the Secretary of State to conclude that the UK Extension provides an adequate level of data protection and lay regulations to that effect, there are four specific areas that could pose risks to UK data subjects if the protections identified are not properly applied. These four risks are: 

Time 5 Minute Read

On August 31, 2023, NetChoice, a national trade association of large online businesses, filed supplemental briefing in its challenge to the California Age-Appropriate Design Code (“CA AADC”). The success or failure of NetChoice’s lawsuit will determine whether companies need to be CA AADC-compliant on July 1, 2024 when the law is anticipated to take effect.

Time 3 Minute Read

On June 12, 2023, the Centre for Information Policy Leadership (“CIPL”) at Hunton Andrews Kurth submitted a response to the U.S. National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s (“NTIA’s”) Request for Comments (“RFC”) on Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) Accountability. The NTIA’s RFC solicited comments on AI accountability measures and policies that can demonstrate trustworthiness of AI systems.

Time 1 Minute Read

On June 8, 2023, the United Kingdom and the United States announced they reached a commitment in principle to establish the UK Extension to the Data Privacy Framework, which will create a “data bridge” between the two countries. U.S. companies approved to join the framework would be able to receive UK personal data under the new data bridge.

Time 4 Minute Read

On December 13, 2022, the European Commission launched the process for the adoption of an adequacy decision for the EU-U.S. Data Privacy Framework. If adopted, the long-awaited adequacy decision will provide EU companies transferring personal data to the U.S. with an additional mechanism to legitimize their transfers.

An adequacy decision would foster trans-Atlantic data flows and address the concerns raised by the Court of Justice of the European Union (“CJEU”) judgment in the Schrems II case.

Time 4 Minute Read

On December 12, 2022, at the “POLITICO Live” event presented in cooperation with Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP’s Centre for Information Policy Leadership ("CIPL")—titled “EU-U.S. Data Flows: Game Changer or More Legal Uncertainty?”—featured speakers from both sides of the Atlantic optimistic that the new EU-U.S. Data Privacy Framework will withstand an anticipated legal challenge.

Time 1 Minute Read

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (“CISA”) recently released a draft of the agency’s Cross-Sector Cybersecurity Performance Goals (“CPGs”) for critical infrastructure in the United States. The CPGs provide a common set of fundamental cybersecurity practices to guide critical infrastructure entities in measuring and improving their cybersecurity maturity.  

Time 1 Minute Read

On October 18, 2022, the Transportation Security Administration (“TSA”) issued a new cybersecurity directive requiring passenger and freight railroad carriers to create plans for responding to cybersecurity incidents. The new directive is one of many actions taken by the Biden Administration to strengthen the cybersecurity posture of the U.S.’s critical infrastructure following a significant ransomware attack on a major U.S. pipeline in 2021.

Time 2 Minute Read

On October 11, 2022, the Biden-Harris Administration released an informational statement about the current Administrations’ progress in strengthening America’s national cybersecurity. The statement provides detail into several new initiatives and sets goals for America’s future in cybersecurity:

Time 2 Minute Read

On October 7, 2022, President Biden signed Executive Order on Enhancing Safeguards for United States Signals Intelligence Activities, which provides a new framework for legal data transfers between the European Union and the United States. The legal basis for transatlantic data transfers has been uncertain since 2020, when the European Court of Justice (“ECJ”) declared the previous framework, the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield, invalid under EU law. 

Time 2 Minute Read

On October 3, 2022, the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) announced that the agreement between the U.S. Government and the UK Government on Access to Electronic Data for the Purpose of Countering Serious Crime (the “CLOUD Act Agreement”) entered into force, effective the same day. The CLOUD Act Agreement, which is authorized by the U.S. Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data (“CLOUD”) Act, is the first of its kind and will allow each country’s investigators to gain access to data held by service providers in the other country, for the purpose of combating serious crime. According to DOJ, this “will greatly enhance the ability of the United States and the United Kingdom to prevent, detect, investigate and prosecute serious crime, including terrorism, transnational organized crime, and child exploitation, among others.”

Time 10 Minute Read

On May 16, 2022, the U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Treasury and the Federal Bureau of Investigation issued combined guidance (“IT Workers Advisory”) on efforts by North Korean nationals to secure freelance engagements as remote information technology (“IT”) workers by posing as non-North Korea nationals. The IT Workers Advisory provides employers with detailed information on how North Korean IT workers operate; highlights red flag indicators for companies hiring freelance developers and for freelance and payment platforms to identify these workers; and provides general mitigation measures for companies to better protect against inadvertently engaging these workers or facilitating the operations of the North Korean government (“DPRK”) in violation of U.S. sanctions.

Time 2 Minute Read

On April 21, 2022, the United States, Canada, Japan, Singapore, the Philippines, the Republic of Korea and Chinese Taipei published a declaration (the “Declaration”) establishing the Global Cross-Border Privacy Rules Forum (the “Global CBPR Forum”). The Global CBPR Forum will establish an international certification system based on the existing APEC Cross-Border Privacy Rules (“CBPR”) and Privacy Recognition for Processors (“PRP”) Systems, enabling participation beyond APEC member economies. The Global CBPR and PRP Systems, as they will be known, are designed to support the free flow of data and effective data protection, and enable interoperability with other privacy frameworks.

Time 2 Minute Read

On January 7, 2022, U.S. Representatives Kathy Castor (D-Fla.) and Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), members of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, wrote to all of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”) Safe Harbor programs to request information about each program to ensure “participants in the program are fulfilling their legal obligations to provide ‘substantially the same or greater protections for children’ as those detailed in the COPPA Rule” and “to solicit feedback” regarding “ways in which Congress can strengthen COPPA and the COPPA Rule.”

Time 1 Minute Read

On January 14, 2022, the Russian Federal Security Service detained members of the REvil ransomware group at the request of the United States, according to public press reports.

Time 3 Minute Read

On November 3, 2021, the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (“CISA”) announced Directive 22-01 - Reducing the Significant Risk of Known Exploited Vulnerabilities (the “Directive”), establishing a CISA-managed catalog of vulnerabilities and compelling federal agencies to remediate such vulnerabilities on government information systems. The Directive targets vulnerabilities that pose a significant risk to the federal government and applies to all software and hardware found on federal information systems, including those managed on an agency’s premises, as well as those hosted by third parties on an agency’s behalf. The Directive is the latest in a series of executive branch efforts to address U.S. cybersecurity in the public and private sectors.

Time 2 Minute Read

On October 21, 2021, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) issued orders to Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, Square and PayPal requesting detailed information about their business practices in relation to payment systems they operate. The CFPB issued the orders pursuant to its statutory authority under the Consumer Financial Protection Act.

Time 2 Minute Read

On October 6, 2021, Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco announced the launch of the new Civil Cyber-Fraud Initiative. Led by the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) Civil Division’s Commercial Litigation Branch, Fraud Section, the initiative will seek to “utilize the False Claims Act (“FCA”) to pursue cybersecurity related fraud by government contractors and grant recipients.”

Time 1 Minute Read
The FTC will hold a virtual open meeting on Thursday, October 21, 2021, at 1pm ET to present the agency’s findings on evidence gathered pursuant to the FTC’s issuance of 6(b) orders in 2019 to six Internet Service Providers and three of their advertising affiliates regarding the parties’ privacy practices. Public release of the FTC Staff report is subject to a vote by the Commission. The presentation of findings will be followed by a verbal public comment period where commenters can share feedback on the FTC’s work and bring matters to the Commission’s attention ...
Time 2 Minute Read

On October 8, 2021, Senator Ed Markey (D-Mass) and Representatives Kathy Castor (D-Fla) and Lori Trahan (D-Mass) penned a letter to Chair of the Federal Trade Commission Lina Khan, urging the agency to ensure that companies uphold the commitments made in their children’s privacy notices and “hold them accountable if they fail to do so.” In the letter, the lawmakers noted that many technology companies have recently announced updates to their respective platforms’ policies that are intended to enhance children and teen protections in compliance with the UK’s Age Appropriate Design Code (“AADC”), which took effect on September 2, 2021.

Time 3 Minute Read

On September 28, 2021, Senators Gary Peters (D-MI) and Rob Portman (R-OH), Chairman and Ranking Member of the Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee, respectively, introduced a bipartisan bill (the “Bill”) that would require owners and operators of critical infrastructure to notify the Director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (“CISA”) within 72 hours of having a reasonable belief that a covered cyber incident has occurred. Additionally, the Bill would require most entities (including businesses with 50 or more employees) that make ransom payments following ransomware attacks to report those payments to the CISA within 24 hours of payment. Notably, any entity required to submit a ransom payment report would first be required to conduct a due diligence review of alternatives to paying ransom, including an analysis of whether recovery from the ransomware attack is possible through other means, before making such a ransom payment. Critical infrastructure owners and operators also would be required to provide supplemental reports to the CISA in light of new or different information becoming available. All entities subject to these requirements would face data preservation obligations.

Time 2 Minute Read

On September 30, 2021, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (“HHS”) Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) issued guidance regarding when the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”) Privacy Rule applies to disclosures and requests for information about a person’s COVID-19 vaccination status.

Time 3 Minute Read

On September 22, 2021, Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas and Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo released a joint statement on the Department of Homeland Security’s (“DHS’s”) issuance of preliminary Critical Infrastructure Control Systems Cybersecurity Performance Goals and Objectives (the “Preliminary Goals”). As we previously reported, on July 28, 2021, the Biden Administration signed a National Security Memorandum on Improving Cybersecurity for Critical Infrastructure Control Systems (the “Memo”), which instructed DHS to lead the development of cybersecurity performance goals for critical infrastructure firms. The Memo described the initiative as “a voluntary, collaborative effort between the Federal Government and the critical infrastructure community to significantly improve the cybersecurity of these critical systems.”

Time 2 Minute Read

On July 31, 2021, Zoom Video Communications, Inc. (“Zoom” or the “Company”) agreed to pay $85 million to settle a class action suit that alleged the Company violated users’ privacy rights by misleading consumers about encryption security, sharing data through third-party integrations without adequate notice or consent, and failing to protect private meetings from being disturbed by “zoombombings.” Class members would be eligible to receive payment, regardless of whether they paid for a Zoom account.

Time 3 Minute Read

On July 28, 2021, President Biden signed a National Security Memorandum entitled “Improving Cybersecurity for Critical Infrastructure Control Systems” (the “Memorandum”). The Memorandum formally establishes an Industrial Control Systems Cybersecurity Initiative and directs the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (“CISA”) and the Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (“NIST”), in collaboration with other agencies, to develop and issue cybersecurity performance goals for critical infrastructure. The Memorandum follows recent high-profile attacks on U.S. critical infrastructure, including ransomware attacks on Colonial Pipeline and JBS Foods.

Time 2 Minute Read

On June 17, 2021, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) announced the reintroduction of the Data Protection Act of 2021 (the “bill”), which would create an independent federal agency, the Data Protection Agency, to “regulate high-risk data practices and the collection, processing, and sharing of personal data.” The bill was first introduced in 2020 and has since been revised to include updated provisions intended to protect against privacy harms, oversee the use of “high-risk data practices” and examine the social, ethical, and economic impacts of data collection.

Time 3 Minute Read

On May 11, 2021, the European Parliament issued a press release requesting that the European Commission amend its draft decisions on UK adequacy to more closely align with EU court rulings and the opinion of the European Data Protection Board (“EDPB”). The request came after the Parliament’s Civil Liberties Committee (the “Committee”) passed a resolution evaluating the Commission’s approach regarding the adequacy of the UK’s data protection regime. The Members of European Parliament (“MEPs”) stated that if the Commission’s implementing decisions are adopted without amendment, transfers of personal data to the UK should be suspended when there is the potential for indiscriminate access to personal data.

Time 5 Minute Read

On May 2, 2021, the Norwegian data protection authority, Datatilsynet, notified Disqus Inc. (“Disqus”), a U.S. company owned by Zeta Global, of its intention to issue a fine of 25 million Norwegian Krone (approximately 2.5 million Euros). The preliminary fine was issued for failure to comply with the General Data Protection Regulation’s (“GDPR”) accountability, lawfulness and transparency requirements, primarily due to Disqus’ tracking of website visitors.

Time 2 Minute Read

On April 13, 2021, the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) announced that the Federal Bureau of Investigation (“FBI”) executed a court-authorized removal of malicious web shells from hundreds of vulnerable computers in the U.S.

Time 2 Minute Read

On March 3, 2020, the New York Department of Financial Services (“NYDFS”) announced it had entered into a settlement with Residential Mortgage Services, Inc. (“RMS”) related to allegations that RMS violated the NYDFS Cybersecurity Regulation in connection with a 2019 data breach.

Time 2 Minute Read

On February 8, 2021, Pinellas County, Florida officials announced that a hacker had remotely gained access to the City of Oldsmar's water treatment system on two separate occasions and was able to change the setting for sodium hydroxide in the water supply. The incident highlights the danger to local government information systems and the dangers of remote access vulnerabilities.

Time 2 Minute Read

On January 19, 2021, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”) published its analysis of the application of the UK General Data Protection Regulation (the “UK GDPR”) to transfers from UK-based firms or branches that are registered, required to be registered or otherwise regulated by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).

Time 2 Minute Read

On January 26, 2021, BBB National Programs announced that it has been endorsed as an Accountability Agent for the APEC Cross-Border Privacy Rules (“CBPR”) and Privacy Recognition for Processors (“PRP”) systems. This makes BBB National Programs the seventh CBPR and PRP Accountability Agent worldwide and the first ever U.S. non-profit to be approved by APEC.

Time 7 Minute Read

The recent UK case of Soriano v Forensic News and Others tested the territorial reach of the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) and represents the first UK judgment dealing with the territorial scope of the GDPR. This was a “service out” case, where the claimant, Walter T. Soriano, sought the Court’s permission under the UK Civil Procedure Rules to serve proceedings on the defendants, who were all domiciled in the U.S.

Time 1 Minute Read

The global privacy and cybersecurity team at Hunton Andrews Kurth has authored multiple chapters of the 2021 Data Protection & Privacy guide by Lexology’s Getting the Deal Through. Partner Aaron P. Simpson and practice chair Lisa J. Sotto served as contributing editors of the ninth edition of the annual guide, which provides summary and analysis in key areas of law, practice and regulation for 150 jurisdictions across the globe.

Time 2 Minute Read

On December 22, 2020, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law legislation that temporarily bans the use or purchase of facial recognition and other biometric identifying technology in public and private schools until at least July 1, 2022. The legislation also directs the New York Commissioner of Education (the “Commissioner”) to conduct a study on whether this technology is appropriate for use in schools.

Time 2 Minute Read

On December 15, 2020, the Federal Trade Commission announced a proposed settlement with Ascension Data & Analytics, LLC, a Texas-based mortgage industry data analytics company (“Ascension”), to resolve allegations that the company failed to ensure one of its vendors was adequately securing personal information of mortgage holders.

Time 3 Minute Read

On December 18, 2020, federal financial regulatory agencies, including the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (collectively, the “Agencies”) announced a proposed rule (the “Proposed Rule”) that would require “banking organizations” to notify their primary federal regulator within 36 hours following any “computer-security incident” that rises to the level of a “notification incident.” The Proposed Rule also would require service providers to notify at least two individuals at the banking organizations they service immediately after experiencing a computer-security incident that materially disrupts, degrades or impairs the services they provide.

Time 2 Minute Read

On November 24, 2020, a multistate coalition of Attorneys General announced that The Home Depot, Inc. (“Home Depot”) agreed to pay $17.5 million and implement a series of data security practices in response to a data breach the company experienced in 2014. The $17.5 million payment will be divided among the 46 participating states and the District of Colombia. We previously reported on a settlement Home Depot reached in 2017 to resolve a putative class action brought by financial institutions impacted by the 2014 data breach.

Time 2 Minute Read

On November 17, 2020, the Senate passed by unanimous consent H.R. 1668, the Internet of Things (“IoT”) Cybersecurity Improvement Act (the “IoT Bill”). The House previously passed the IoT Bill in September after negotiations with the Senate to resolve differences in their respective bills. The IoT Bill now heads to the President’s desk for signature.

Time 3 Minute Read

On October 22, 2020, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (the “Proposed Rule”) to implement Section 1033 of the Dodd-Frank Act (the “Act”) regarding consumers’ access to their financial information.

Time 1 Minute Read

On August 25, 2020, Hunton’s Centre for Information Policy Leadership (“CIPL”) released a new paper entitled “Data Protection in the New Decade: Lessons from COVID-19 for a US Privacy Framework.” The paper examines how the COVID-19 pandemic has emphasized the need for a U.S. federal privacy law.

Time 2 Minute Read

On June 1, 2020, U.S. Senators Maria Cantwell (WA) and Bill Cassidy (LA) introduced the Exposure Notification Privacy Act (the “Act”), bipartisan legislation that would impose requirements and restrictions on operators of automated exposure notification services. The bill defines automated exposure notification service as “a website, online service, online application, mobile application, or mobile operating system that is offered in commerce in the U.S. and that is designed, in part or in full, specifically to be used for, or marketed for, the purpose of digitally notifying, in an automated manner, an individual who may have become exposed to an infectious disease (or the device of such individual, or a person or entity that reviews such disclosures).” These services are commonly referred to as “contact tracing technology” because they are designed to provide alerts when a user comes in near-contact with someone who tested positive for an infectious disease, such as COVID-19.

Time 2 Minute Read

On May 19, 2020, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) announced that it reached an agreement with Swiss digital game developer Miniclip, S.A. (“Miniclip”) to settle allegations that Miniclip misled consumers about its membership in a COPPA safe harbor program.

Time 3 Minute Read

On May 14, 2020 Democrats in both the House and Senate introduced the Public Health Emergency Privacy Act (“the Act”). In the House, the Act was sponsored by Representatives Jan Schakowsky (IL), Anna Eshoo (CA) and Suzan DelBene (WA), and in the Senate was sponsored by Senators Richard Blumenthal (CT) and Mark Warner (VA). Similar to the recently-introduced COVID-19 Consumer Data Protection Act of 2020, the Act would put temporary rules in place regarding the collection, use and disclosure of emergency health data used to combat the spread of the coronavirus. The rules imposed by the Act would only apply during the course of the Public Health Emergency as declared by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) and would only apply to specific uses of certain personal data.

Time 1 Minute Read

In a “Ten Years Hence” speaker series hosted by the University of Notre Dame, Lisa Sotto, Chair of Hunton Andrews Kurth’s global Privacy and Cybersecurity practice, highlights why privacy and cybersecurity will remain relevant issues now and for decades to come in a lecture on Privacy and Cybersecurity: The New Frontier.

Time 1 Minute Read

On May 1, 2020, the White House issued an executive order on securing the United States bulk-power system (the “Order”), finding that foreign adversaries are creating and exploiting vulnerabilities in the U.S. bulk-power system (“BPS") and determining that unrestricted foreign supply of BPS equipment constitutes an “unusual and extraordinary threat” to national security. The Order imposes restrictions on certain transactions involving BPS equipment in which foreign adversaries of the United States have an interest.

Time 4 Minute Read

On April 9, 2020 the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation held a “paper hearing” entitled Enlisting Big Data in the Fight Against Coronavirus. A “paper hearing” consists of the committee members submitting opening statements and witnesses submitting testimony, which were posted on the Committee’s website. Witnesses were required to submit answers to member questions last week.

Time 4 Minute Read

On March 26, 2020, Washington D.C. enacted bill number B23-0215, amending D.C.’s data breach notification law (the “Bill”). Among other requirements, the Bill requires the provision of identity theft prevention services in certain data breaches, establishes a new regulatory reporting requirement in the event of a cognizable data breach affecting 50 or more residents of D.C., and imposes certain data security requirements on covered businesses.

Time 3 Minute Read

On March 17, 2020, the Executive Committee of the Global Privacy Assembly (“GPA”) issued a statement giving their support to the sharing of personal data by organizations and governments for the purposes of fighting the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. The GPA brings together data protection regulators from over 80 countries and its membership currently consists of more than 130 data protection regulators around the world, including the UK Information Commissioner’s Office, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, and the data protection regulators for all EU Member States.

Time 3 Minute Read

On March 12, 2020, Senator Jerry Moran (KS) introduced a comprehensive federal privacy bill entitled the Consumer Data Privacy and Security Act of 2020 (the “Act”).

Time 2 Minute Read

On January 16, 2020, the Senate approved the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“USMCA”), sending it to the President’s desk for ratification. Mexico ratified the Agreement in June 2019, and Canada is expected to follow suit later this month. To coincide with its ratification, the Centre for Information Policy Leadership (“CIPL”) at Hunton Andrews Kurth issued a white paper entitled What Does the USMCA Mean for a U.S. Federal Privacy Law?

Time 2 Minute Read

On June 19, 2019, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (“NIST”) issued its draft SP 800-171B guidelines (the “draft”), which outlines enhanced measures to protect controlled unclassified information (“CUI”) held by government contractors.

Time 1 Minute Read

On June 20, 2019, the Senate confirmed Keith Krach as Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and Environment. The former DocuSign and Ariba CEO, nominated by President Trump in January of 2019, will function as the permanent ombudsperson for the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield agreement as part of his role, addressing complaints related to U.S. protection of EU data.

Time 2 Minute Read

On May 31, 2019, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (“APEC”) endorsed Schellman & Company as the second U.S. “Accountability Agent” overseeing the APEC Cross-Border Privacy Rules (“CBPR”) and Privacy Recognition for Processors (“PRP”) systems. Along with TrustArc, Schellman & Company will now be able to independently assess and certify the compliance of U.S. companies under the APEC CBPR and PRP systems.

Time 1 Minute Read
On April 26, 2019, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) Office for Civil Rights announced reductions in available penalties for three out of four tiers of privacy and security violations set forth in the HITECH Act, based on the severity of the violation. Previously, all four tiers of violation were subject to a maximum annual civil monetary penalty of $1.5 million. The revised regime provides for maximum civil penalties of $25,000 for the lowest tier of violation (i.e., unknowing violations), $100,000 for the second tier of violation (i.e., violations where ...
Time 2 Minute Read

On May 30, 2018, the federal government released a report that identifies gaps in assets and capabilities required to manage the consequences of a cyber attack on the U.S. electric grid. The assessment is a result of the U.S. Department of Energy (“DOE”) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s (“DHS”) combined efforts to assess the potential scope and duration of a prolonged power outage associated with a significant cyber incident and the United States’ readiness to manage the consequences of such an incident.

Time 2 Minute Read

The U.S. Department of Justice (the “DOJ”) has unsealed an indictment accusing nine Iranian nationals of engaging in a “massive and brazen cyber assault” against at least 176 universities, 47 private companies and 7 government agencies and non-governmental organizations, including the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”). According to the DOJ, the nationals worked for Mabna Institute, an Iranian-based company, as “hackers for hire,” stealing login credentials and other sensitive information to sell within Iran and for the benefit of the Iranian government.

Time 1 Minute Read

Recently, the fourth edition of the book, The International Comparative Legal Guide to: Data Protection 2017, was published by the Global Legal Group. Hunton & Williams’ Global Privacy and Cybersecurity lawyers prepared several chapters in the guide, including the opening chapter on “All Change for Data Protection: The European Data Protection Regulation,” co-authored by London partner Bridget Treacy and associate Anita Bapat. Several other global privacy and cybersecurity team members also prepared chapters in the guide, including David Dumont (Belgium), Claire François (France), Judy Li (China), Manuel E. Maisog (China), Wim Nauwelaerts (Belgium), Anna Pateraki (Germany), Aaron P. Simpson (United States), Adam Smith (United Kingdom) and Jenna Rode (United States).

Time 1 Minute Read

The Privacy team at Hunton & Williams has authored several chapters of the recently published 2017 guide to data protection and privacy for Getting the Deal Through. The publication covers data privacy and data protection laws in 26 jurisdictions across the globe. Wim Nauwelaerts, Privacy team partner in the firm’s Brussels office, served as the contributing editor of the guide and co-authored the Belgium chapter and the EU overview.

Time 1 Minute Read

Hunton & Williams LLP is proud to announce our Privacy & Information Security Law Blog has been named the top Cybersecurity and Information Privacy blog by The Expert Institute and #2 overall Best AmLaw Blog of 2016. All of our lawyers and contributors thank you for your support in making the blog a success.

Time 1 Minute Read

Only Three Days Left to Vote!

Hunton & Williams LLP is proud to announce our Privacy & Information Security Law Blog has been nominated in The Expert Institute’s 2016 Best Legal Blog Contest for Best AmLaw Blog of 2016. From all of the editors, lawyers and contributors that make our blog a success, we appreciate your continued support and readership, and ask that you please take a moment to vote for our blog!

The Privacy & Information Security Law Blog was ranked as the #1 Privacy & Data Security blog in LexBlog’s 2015 AmLaw 200 Blog Benchmark Report, and named PR News’ Best Legal PR Blog ...

Time 1 Minute Read

Hunton & Williams LLP is proud to announce our Privacy & Information Security Law Blog has been nominated in The Expert Institute’s 2016 Best Legal Blog Contest for Best AmLaw Blog of 2016. From all of the editors, lawyers and contributors that make our blog a success, we appreciate your continued support and readership, and ask that you please take a moment to vote for our blog!

The Privacy & Information Security Law Blog was ranked as the #1 Privacy & Data Security blog in LexBlog’s 2015 AmLaw 200 Blog Benchmark Report, and named PR News’ Best Legal PR Blog in 2011. It was noted that the ...

Time 1 Minute Read

Hunton & Williams announces its participation with the Global Legal Group in the publication of the third edition of the book The International Comparative Legal Guide to: Data Protection 2016. The guide provides corporate counsel and international practitioners with a comprehensive worldwide legal analysis of the laws and regulations relating to data protection. Bridget Treacy, partner and head of the UK privacy and cybersecurity practice, served as the contributing editor of the guide and co-authored the UK chapter.

Search

Subscribe Arrow

Recent Posts

Categories

Tags

Archives

Jump to Page